The first signs of 'permanent slowdown' were seen in the rate of increase in the amount of carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere.

According to the joint study of the Dutch Environmental Assessment Agency and the European Commission, the first signs of 'permanent slowdown' were seen in the increase in the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) released into the atmosphere at the global level.
According to the study, the rate of increase in carbon dioxide emissions decreased by more than half last year compared to the average of the 2000s.
The main reasons for the decrease in the rate of increase are the increasing use of shale gas in power generation in the USA and the increase in China's hydroelectric use by 23 percent.

However, the problem of using cheap coal continues. It is stated that the use of cheap coal in the UK has increased by a quarter.
According to the report, the amount of carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere last year reached a new record with 34,5 tons.
However, despite the global economy growing by 3,5 percent, carbon dioxide emissions rose by 1,4 percent.

It was emphasized that the link between economic growth and the rate of increase in carbon dioxide emissions is broken with less fossil fuel use, more use of renewable energy sources and more energy savings.

'Good news, but not enough'
According to the study, the USA, China and European Union countries produce 55 percent of total carbon dioxide emissions. However, the report states that there have been 'significant developments' in all three of these countries.

While it is stated that China's carbon dioxide emissions increased by 3 percent last year, it is said that this is an important step compared to the annual increase of 2000 percent in the 10s.

In the report, it is emphasized that the slowdown in the rate of increase in carbon dioxide emission may be permanent if the transition to shale gas continues in the USA, if China's compliance with the energy plans announced and the use of renewable energy sources especially in Europe continues.

Greet Maenhout, co-author of the report, said: 'This is good news, but not enough. Emissions are still increasing and carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere for 100 years. In other words, we are still not getting close to the target of 2050 degrees of temperature increase in 2," he said.

co2 release

 

Source :project.hurriyet

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