Beware of These Plants! Ministry Follows Herbs Believed to Heal

The Ministry of Health has announced plants that are known to be good for many diseases for centuries, but also cause discomfort when used incorrectly. Many plants, from horse chestnut to garlic, from red pepper to senna, for which the Ministry has warned, cannot be used in food supplements and herbal products.

A study was carried out by the Turkish Medicines and Medical Devices Agency of the Ministry of Health in order that herbal medicines taken without consulting a physician due to the belief that "it is natural and has no side effects" in the society do not pose a threat to public health.

Within the scope of the study carried out to regulate the market and to manage the control of the products in the market, many international literature such as the European Pharmacopoeia of 88 plants, the warnings of the world's leading institutions such as the American Medicines and Food Agency (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMA) were scanned.

In this study, the effects of these plants on pregnant women, those under the age of 18 and chronic patients, and the negative consequences of their unnecessary and excessive use were determined.

It has been reported that the plants in the list, published with the approval of the Minister of Health, Mehmet Müezinoğlu, cannot be used in food supplements and herbal products.

Beware of these plants
Some of the plants in the list published by the Ministry of Health and warnings are as follows:

-Horse chestnut: Gastrointestinal complaints, headache, vertigo, itching and allergic reactions may occur. There is a risk of embolism and thrombosis in open wounds. It should be used with caution in chronic kidney and gall bladder disorders. It reduces the absorption of vitamins A, D, E and K. Substances that prevent blood clotting, fenopirazone, should not be used with digoxin, which is effective in the treatment of heart failure and rhythm disorders. It is not suitable for use by children and young people under the age of 18. Not recommended for pregnant and lactating women.

-Lion's foot (Hazelnut grass): It should not be used in pregnant and lactating mothers due to insufficient data on safety.

-Garlic: It causes complaints in the gastrointestinal tract, increases the risk of bleeding with allergic dermatitis and allergic asthma, and prolongs blood clotting time. Sudden changes in blood sugar may occur when taken with antidiabetics. Not recommended for use in pregnant and lactating women.

-Sapahir (Oud tree): Cramp in the gastrointestinal tract, loss of electrolytes and potassium, albumin and erythrocytes in the urine are seen. It causes potassium loss when used with cardiac glycosides, antiarrhythmics, diuretics and corticosteroids. It should not be used in Crohns disease and ulcerative colitis. There is a risk of colorectal cancer. It is not recommended for use in children under 12 years of age, pregnant and lactating.

-Bearberry: Causes nausea, vomiting, hypersensitivity. It should not be used for longer than a week. Not suitable for children under 12 years old. Not recommended for use in pregnant and lactating women.

-Oat: May cause hypersensitivity reactions. It is not recommended for use in children under 12 years of age, pregnant and lactating. It should be used with caution by people with celiac disease as data on protein content are not available. Care should be taken while using it, as it may affect the ability to drive and use machines.

-Nergiz (Aynisefa): Contact dermatitis may occur, hypersensitivity reactions may develop. It should not be used in children under 12 years of age due to insufficient data on safety. Not recommended for use in pregnant and lactating women. A doctor should be contacted if signs of skin infection appear.

-Red pepper: In toxic doses, decrease in body temperature below normal, long-term high doses of gastritis, kidney and liver disorders and neurotoxic effects can be seen.

-Senna: 30 grams of dry dose cannot be exceeded. It should not be used in children under the age of 12. In elderly patients, half the normal dose should be taken. It should be used with caution, as overdose may cause electrolyte and fluid imbalance. It should not be used in intestinal obstruction, inflammatory bowel diseases, appendicitis and electrolyte deficiency.

-Thursday: It is not recommended for appendicitis, acute inflammation of the intestine, children under 12 years of age, pregnant and lactating mothers. In case of overdose, cramp-like gastrointestinal complaints and laxative effect may occur. In long-term use, it may cause loss of electrolytes, especially potassium ions.

-Hawthorn: It should not be used under the age of 12.

-Turmeric: It is not used in bile duct obstructions. In case of gallstones, it requires doctor control. It is not used in gastric ulcer.

-Engineer: It is not used in those who are sensitive to daisy family plants. It is used under physician control in patients with obstruction in the bile duct.

-Echinacea: Theoretically well tolerated, the most commonly reported adverse events are gastrointestinal disturbances and rashes. It is recommended not to use for more than 10 days. The European Medicines Agency does not recommend its use in children and is not recommended for use in children younger than 1 year. Since it inhibits “CYP1A2” enzymes in humans, it may cause an increase in the level of drugs metabolized by this enzyme. There are limited data on its use in pregnancy. Studies on its use during lactation are similarly limited, but the European Medicines Agency recommends that its use should be avoided during pregnancy and lactation. The agency also recommends that it should not be used in progressive systemic disorders, immune system diseases, immune system insufficiency, and white blood cell system diseases due to its immunostimulating effect. Administration by injection is associated with chills, fever and muscle weakness.

-Goat weed (Horny Goat Weed): Capsules and tablets are sold in different dosages. Use in high doses may cause sweating or fever.

-Eucalyptus: The substance called “cineol” in its content should not be used in babies under 30 months, as it may cause uncontrolled or involuntary muscle contraction in the larynx. It is not recommended for use in children under the age of 18 due to the lack of sufficient data on safety. If breathing difficulties, inflamed sputum and fever are observed during use, a doctor should be consulted immediately.

-Clove: No information is available on general precautions or precautions regarding drug interactions, drug and laboratory test interactions, teratogenic or non-teratogenic effects in pregnancy, nursing mothers, or pediatric use. Therefore, the leaves or bark should not be used during pregnancy or lactation or in children without medical supervision.

-Ginsweed: It should not be used in pregnant women. Its use in high doses can cause restlessness, headache, diarrhoea, digestive system disorders such as gas and swelling of the lips. Loss of consciousness may occur in susceptible individuals.

-Mumbanicorn (Yellow St. John's Wort): Not recommended for use in young people and children under the age of 18. It should not be used in people with hypersensitivity to the active substance. Especially in sensitive skin, due to the risk of photosensitivity, the dose should be observed and direct sunlight should not be exposed. Possible interactions with general or local anesthetics should be determined before the surgery, and if possible, the use of herbal medicine should be discontinued.

-Triple (Xinjiang thorn): Urticaria-like allergic reactions may develop. It should not be used in pregnant and lactating mothers due to insufficient data on safety. It is not recommended for use in diarrhea, fever, arthritis and severe inflammation. Vomiting, dizziness, palpitations, nausea may occur in high doses. It should not be used in people taking warfarin due to possible drug interactions.

-Sonflower (Melissa, lemongrass, cohosh): It should not be used in children under 12 years of age, pregnant and nursing mothers, as there is insufficient data on safety. It should be taken with caution by people who drive and use machines.

-Pomegranate of power: It has been reported that the plant has a low stimulant effect in traditional use and scientific studies. Side effects were recorded as hypoglycemic coma, convulsions in children, favism type symptoms, headache, decreased fertility in mice, and increased levels of gamma-glutamyltransferase and alkaline phosphatase in experimental animals.

Ginseng: Since there will be a decrease in blood glucose level in hyperglycemic people, it should be used under the supervision of a doctor. It should be left 7 days before the surgical operation. Estrogenic side effects can be seen in pre- and post-menopausal women. It should not be used for more than 3 months. It should not be used in children under 18 years of age, pregnant or lactating mothers, as there is insufficient data on safety. During use, reactions such as urticaria and itching, stomach discomfort, gastrointestinal complaints such as nausea and vomiting may occur. When used with large amounts of caffeine, hypertension may occur and may lower blood alcohol concentration.

- Wheel of Fortune (Time Rose): It should not be used in children under 12 years of age, pregnant and lactating mothers due to insufficient data on safety. It should be taken into account that it may adversely affect the use of vehicles and machinery. Rarely, tenderness may occur.

-Primrose: It should not be used in children under 18 years of age, pregnant or lactating mothers, as there is insufficient data on safety. Caution should be exercised when used by people with gastritis or stomach ulcers. If breathing difficulties, fever and inflammatory sputum occur during use, a doctor should be contacted immediately. Overdose may cause stomach upset, vomiting or diarrhea. May cause allergic reactions.

-Bitter Almond: The seeds are not considered safe in any form, as they can have a potential cyanide effect due to the amygdalin it contains. The effect that will occur when taken orally is more severe than the effect that will occur through the muscle or the vein. Pupil dilation, dizziness, closure of the eyelids, drowsiness, headache, acceleration in breathing, muscle weakness, pain in the stomach, nausea and vomiting occur. When used in high doses, slowing of brain functions and breathing are seen. There are cases that resulted in death.

-Pomegranate: When the alkaloid content is taken over 80 grams from the stem bark and roots, vomiting, dizziness, visual impairment and breathing problems occur. There is no problem for health in the preparations prepared from fruit juice, fruit peel extract and seed oil at recommended doses. However, due to the grain content, pain may occur in sensitive stomachs in fruit juice and fruit peel extracts.

-Horoscope (Mistletooth): May cause headache, orthostatic hypotension, high fever, chest pain, allergic reactions and chills. After treatment with mistletoe, bradycardia, cardiac arrest, coma, hallucinations, gastroenteritis, hypotension, and pancreatic hemorrhages may occur. It should not be used in chronic and progressive infections (tuberculosis), hyperthyroidism, inflammatory diseases where the body temperature exceeds 38 degrees, nervous system tumors, spinal cord tumors. Treatment should be discontinued when the patient has a high fever. Above the therapeutic dose, it can cause death in children due to the emetic effect of the fruits. It should not be used together with antipyretic drugs. It is not recommended to be used with antihypertensives, heart medications, drugs that suppress the immune system, and nervous system depressants.

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Source : your messenger

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